<img src="https://www.chengdubeer.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/beer-market.jpg" alt="China’s [Craft] Beer Market中国精酿啤酒" class="img-responsive" srcset="">

China and alcohol: in 2010 Chinese widely acquired a taste (or should we say face-ginving-culture?) for wine and so created a wine bubble, in 2011 high spirits raised Chinese liquor pices 20% and created what’s called the Moutai mania. 2013 seemed to be the Chinese year of a good pint of beer.

Beer is nothing new to China at all and the Chinese already consume more beer than any other nationality. The global brewing giants, AB-Inbev and SAB Miller, have long been on the ground fighting for –and winning– market share. Moreover, China has plenty of its own established brands such as Tsingtao and Snow.

However, two new trends make China a potential growing market for both local and international brewers: consumers are not only drinking more beer, but are also beginning to drink more hi-end beers.

Sales growth of beer in China was steadily upward – from 7 per cent in 2010 to 13 per cent last year (both wine and spirits sales were still higher that year, but sales dropped significantly compared to the years before). An interesting result is that his drop in growth of wine and spirits sales could leave room for high-end brews to find new interest.

As the Chinese begin to travel more, they should notice the “craft beer revolution” that is taking place in the US (and Europe), and will want to drink craft beer at home = it may even be a status thing for a while. Chinese who have tried craft beer during their stays abroad will want to find craft beer back in China.

As China continues to open up to the outside world, there is a lot of promise – the time is more right than ever for premium beers to hit the market and craft beer is slowly infiltrating. What is needed is a community that is passionate about craft beer – moving away from the mass consumed light, filtered down beers to appreciation of the real stuff. This can be achieved in 2 manners: one is by imported craft beers, the other is by local high-quality craft beers. Craft beer is slowly infiltrating into China [to beer importers like Vandergeeten, Duvel Moortgat and DXCEL], and locals are starting to take notice. Local craft breweries in the beginning mostly inspired by foreigners, though the Chinese learn quickly. For an overview of the craft breweries in China, check here.

beer marketChina and alcohol: in 2010 Chinese widely acquired a taste (or should we say face-ginving-culture?) for wine and so created a wine bubble, in 2011 high spirits raised Chinese liquor pices 20% and created what’s called the Moutai mania. This year seems to be the Chinese year of a good pint of beer.

Beer is nothing new to China at all and the Chinese already consume more beer than any other nationality. The global brewing giants, AB-Inbev and SAB Miller, have long been on the ground fighting for –and winning– market share. Moreover, China has plenty of its own established brands such as Tsingtao and Snow.

However, two new trends make China a potential growing market for both local and international brewers: consumers are not only drinking more beer, but are also beginning to drink more hi-end beers.

Sales growth of beer in China was steadily upward – from 7 per cent in 2010 to 13 per cent last year (both wine and spirits sales were still higher that year, but sales dropped significantly compared to the years before). An interesting result is that his drop in growth of wine and spirits sales could leave room for high-end brews to find new interest.

We from Chengdu Beer can tell from our craft brewing colleagues throughout China that the time is more right than ever for premium beers to hit the market!

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